Studies


Skin Damage

As you age, your skin undergoes gradual changes:

Cells divide more slowly, and the inner layer of skin (the dermis) starts to thin. Fat cells beneath the dermis begin to shrink. Additionally, the ability of the skin to repair itself decreases with age, so wounds heal more slowly. The thinning skin becomes prone to injuries and damage.

The deeper layer of the skin, which provides the support structure for the surface skin layers, loosens and unravels. The skin then loses its elasticity (ability to stretch and return to position). As a result, skin sags and forms furrows.

The glands that secrete oil shrink. This atrophy leaves the skin without a protective layer of oil. As the skin's ability to stay moisturized decreases, the skin becomes dry and scaly.

Frown lines (between the eyebrows) and crow's feet (lines that spread from the corners of the eyes) develop because of repetitive muscle contractions during facial expressions. And the loss elasticity in the skin. Gravity causes skin and tissues to sag, leading to the formation of jowls and drooping eyelids.

Vitamin C. 

Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is a strong antioxidant that may also help rebuild collagen. Though there are many vitamin C products, none has been approved as a treatment for age-related skin conditions. Most research on the effects of antioxidants on the skin has used this vitamin. In laboratory studies, vitamin C seems to reduce or even protect against damage to skin cells caused by UV radiation. Vitamin C also seems to help skin cells survive after exposure to UV rays.

Vitamin E 

Vitamin E may decrease skin roughness, the length of facial lines, and wrinkle depth. 

Resources

Aging Skin Net www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet

American Academy of Dermatology www.aad.org

American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery www.surgery.org

 

2. Vitamin C and Skin Health

Vitamin C is an essential part of skin health both as a small molecular weight antioxidant and as a critical factor for collagen synthesis. Vitamin C contributes to photoprotection, decreases photodamage, and contributes to wound healing. Oral supplementation with vitamin C may help prevent UV-induced damage, especially in combination with supplemental vitamin E. Dietary vitamin C may also provide photoprotection.

Despite inconsistencies in vitamin C preparations and study design, the data suggest that vitamin C is most effective in protecting against damage induced by UV light and also has utility in the treatment of photodamage and/or skin wrinkling, both of which are associated with premature aging of the skin. Vitamin C appears to benefit dry skin and may support wound healing. Lastly, the greatest effects of vitamin C supplementation are seen when it is combined with other micronutrients, such as vitamin E.

Ref: Alexander J. Michels, Ph.D. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University

3. Vitamin D and Anti-Aging

Chang et al. also suggest an association between the visible effects of aging and levels of 25(OH)D3, another precursor of vitamin D. It may be possible that low 25(OH)D3 levels in women, who show less skin aging may reflect underlying genetic differences in vitamin D synthesis.62

Many other studies that tested oral vitamin D treatment showed skin cancer prevention, which is associated to anti-aging effects.

Ref: Glossmann H, BitamninD. Gerontology. 2011;57:350-3. Doi: 10.1159/000322521.

Ref: Lehmann B. Role of the vitamin D3. Doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2008.00810.x.

 

Biotin

Biotin is also a nutrient that helps us keep a young, attractive appearance since it plays a major part in maintaining the health of our hair, nails, and skin. In fact, biotin sometimes gets the nickname the “H” vitamin, which stems from the German words Haar and Haut that mean “hair and skin.” Vitamin B7 Biotin is commonly added to hair and skin beauty products, although it’s believed not to be absorbed very well through the skin and actually must be ingested for the benefits to be fully reaped.

 

Ref. PubMed Health, Published November 1, 2016

 

Study: Oral MSM Reduces Wrinkles, Improves Skin Texture.

A recent, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study published in the Natural Medicine Journal studied the effectiveness of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) as an oral supplement on skin health (2015;7(11). An initial preclinical in vitro gene marker study evaluated the effects of 2.5 percent MSM solution on the expression of 92 genes associated with skin function. The primary clinical trial randomized 20 female participants to receive either 3 g/d of MSM or placebo over 16 weeks. Skin health was evaluated through expert grading, instrumentation and participant self-assessment at weeks eight and 16.

“The preclinical stage showed MSM impacted gene expression in a 3D skin model," explained Rod Benjamin, director of technical development at Bergstrom Nutrition and an author of the study. “We then followed up this preclinical data with a human clinical study that has shown efficacy utilizing three separate types of measurements: grading, instrumentation and participant self-assessment."

After 16 weeks, MSM regulated the genomic expression of key genes responsible for skin health and the prevention of aging. Furthermore, MSM supplementation showed statistically significant improvements over placebo by expert grading in crow’s feet and skin firmness, and statistically significant improvements from baseline in crow’s feet, skin firmness, tone, and texture. Using photo instrumentation analysis, MSM supplementation produced statistically significant improvements over placebo for wrinkle (crow’s feet) total count, length, severity and deep line counts and for wrinkles (global) total count, length, and severity. The product was well-tolerated, and overall, the MSM group gave more favorable self-assessment than the placebo group, though the improvement was not statistically significant.

The researchers concluded: “MSM supplementation appears to benefit skin health, primarily the reduction of fine lines and wrinkles. Effects on gene expression may partially account for the benefits, but further research is needed to verify results and mechanism of action."

Benjamin noted: “With MSM being 34 percent sulfur by weight, it has long been recognized for its potential in supporting healthy skin. However, scientific data supporting efficacy in this area has been lacking," said. “This study helps fill the gap, providing scientific data that supports the oral efficacy of MSM for reducing fine wrinkles and supporting healthy skin."

Ref: Natural Product Insider; November 2015

 

Effect of Oral Supplementation with Methylsulfonylmethane on Skin Health and Wrinkle Reduction.

Objective. The effects and perception of aging are directly reflected in the health and condition of the skin. Beauty and anti-aging products largely focus on treatment of the skin with an outside-in strategy. There is demand for “beauty from within” products that support underlying internal processes necessary for healthy and vital skin. This study assesses the effectiveness of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) as an oral supplement on skin health using expert grading, instrumental measurements, and participant self-evaluation.

Methods. An initial preclinical in vitro gene marker study evaluated the effects of 2.5%

MSM solution on the expression of 92 genes associated with skin function. The primary double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial randomized 20 female participants to receive either 3 g per day of MSM or placebo over 16 weeks. Skin health was evaluated through expert grading, instrumentation, and participant self-assessment at weeks 8 and 16. 

Results. 

MSM regulates the genomic expression of key genes responsible for skin health and the prevention of the visible signs of aging. Furthermore, MSM supplementation showed statistically significant improvements over placebo by expert grading in crow’s feet and skin firmness, and statistically significant improvements from baseline in crow’s feet, skin firmness, tone, and texture. Using photo instrumentation analysis, MSM supplementation produced statistically significant improvements over placebo for wrinkle (crow’s feet) total count, length, severity, and deep line counts and for wrinkles (global) total count, length, and severity. The product was well tolerated, and overall, the MSM group gave more favorable self-assessment than the placebo group, though the improvement was not statistically significant. Conclusion. MSM supplementation appears to benefit skin health, primarily the reduction of fine lines and wrinkles. Effects on gene expression may partially account for the benefits, but further research is needed to verify results and mechanism of action.

Ref: Natural Medicine Journal, by Michael Anthonavage, Rod Benjamin, and Eric Withee.

 

Horsetail (shave grass) is a super-herb providing silica and antioxidants

(NaturalNews) Horsetail, also known as shave grass, has been used from prehistoric times. Horsetail is one of the richest plant sources of silica known to humankind. Natural health advocate David Wolfe calls horsetail one of the top six "super-herbs." Silica in horsetail helps give bones their strength and keeps skin from wrinkling. Collagen, the substance which gives skin its elasticity, is made of silica.

Ref: Natural News

Studies have shown that bactericide, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, silica, and antioxidant agents in horsetail may give the capability to it to cure wounds, rashes, burns, skin lesions, and acne. Silica is proven to help form collagen which is significant for the growth and the care of healthy connective tissues throughout the body. Consequently, horsetail extract is extensively used in anti-wrinkle, anti-aging- and other cosmetic items. One easy home remedy would be to utilize horsetail extract paste on the affected skin for at least 20 minutes several times per week. By drinking horsetail tea, its antioxidant action and anti-inflammatory capabilities may delay aging by strengthening the connective tissues and might help alleviate the irritated and inflamed skin. For acne, diluted horsetail tea that is iced may be utilized as a toner after washing the face every evening. Simply dab a cotton swab into the tea and use it all over the face while being sure to completely avoid the eyes.

Ref: Natural Alternative Remedy

 

Green Tea

Skin cancer. The main polyphenol in green tea is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Scientific studies suggest that EGCG and green tea polyphenols have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties that may help prevent the development and growth of skin tumors.

Ref: Katiyar SK, Ahmad N, Mukhtar H. Green tea and skin. Arch Dermatol. 2000;136(8):989-99

 

Licorice Root, the Natural Option for Sensitive Skin

Licorice root is one of the most popular anti-aging herbs used in Chinese medicine. It’s useful for combination skin because it’s famous for its ability to lighten dark areas, like age spots from UV damage or acne scarring. There is a substance in licorice extract called glabridin that is believed to be one of the reasons behind its skin lightening effect. Glabridin restricts the enzymes in your body that cause pigmentation from sun exposure and can even help to reduce the appearance of dark scars. Licorice also contains an active ingredient called liquirtin, which studies have shown can improve melasma, a skin condition characterized by dark patches, even for combination skin. When applied topically, licorice root extract can help reduce sebum production and swelling in oily areas, while working its soothing reparative magic on the dry area this is what makes it one of the top anti-aging and anti-acne herbs.

Licorice root has a good reputation as being helpful for sensitive skin. Licorice root contains an active compound called “glabridin.” Licorice extract may also help diminish the appearance of dark under-eye circles, discoloration and age spots.

The extract also has powerful antioxidants that help protect the skin from environmental stressors, as well as “licochalcone,” which helps balance oil, making this a good ingredient for those with oily skin.

 

 

Ref: Licorice,” University of Maryland Medical Center, http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/licorice-000262.htm.

Ref: Licorice—Treats more than a sweet tooth,” Truth in Aging, October 27, Ref: 2009, http://www.truthinaging.com/ingredient-spotlight/licorice-treats-more-than-a-sweet-tooth.

 

WHY HYALURONIC ACID IS IMPORTANT FOR THE SKIN

As we age, skin moisture can drop significantly, which makes the skin lose elasticity and expose the visible signs of aging. Hyaluronic acid plays a critical role in skin health with its unique ability to hold in moisture (1000 ml of water per gram of hyaluronic acid).

Hyaluronic acid is also a “smart nutrient” as it can adjust its moisture absorption rate based on the humidity—relative to the season and the climate.

HYALURONIC ACID RESEARCH

Researchers have found Hyaluronic Acid supplementation to be directly correlated to measured increases in skin moisture. Microscopic skin surface analysis shows increased skin smoothness and amelioration of wrinkles. 

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HYALURONIC ACID AS A SUPPLEMENT

Hyaluronic acid is extremely beneficial as an oral supplement as it plays a critical role in the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in the body. Collagen is critical to the skin because it supports skin structure. As the body's collagen declines, the appearance of wrinkles and discoloration become more visible. Maximizing collagen levels will keep skin supple. Hyaluronic acid keeps collagen synthesis up, as well as retaining skin moisture, contributing to the anti-aging benefits to the skin. Higher levels of collagen and hyaluronic acid are related to skin that is more supple and resistant to wrinkles and fine lines.

The effectiveness of an oral Hyaluronic Acid supplementation has been somewhat controversial. There have been studies showing hyaluronic acid to be extremely effective with oral supplementation. Theories abound whether Hyaluronic Acid is directly affecting the outcome, or if it is an indirect effect due to higher blood levels—prompting the body to respond by generating its own supply of hyaluronic acid (proven due to the supplementation).

Hyaluronic acid is of great benefit when applied topically and taken as an oral supplement.

Ref: Articular cartilage is the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints.

Ref: Sato T, Sakamato O, Odanaka W, Yoshida K, and Urishibata, O: Clinical Effects of dietary hyaluronic acid on dry, rough skin. J. Aesthetic Dermatology Vol. 12 109-120, 2002

Ref: Kajimoto O, Odanaka W, Sakamoto W, Yoshida K, Takahashi T.: Clinical Effects of Hyaluronic acid diet for dry skin. J. New Rem & Clin: 90-102, 2001.

 

 


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